In the videos below, two Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellows share an insightful discussion on Bey’s photography and the power of his work.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

Four part portrait of a black girl wearing a school uniform and a necklace that reads “Diana.”
Four part portrait of a black girl wearing a school uniform and a necklace that reads “Diana.”
Dawoud Bey (American, born 1953), Diana, 1998

Since the beginning of his career in the 1970s, Dawoud Bey (American, born 1953) has used his camera to create poignant meditations on visibility, race, place, and American history. From early street portraits made in Harlem to a recent series imagining an escape from slavery on the Underground Railroad, Bey explores photography’s potential to reveal underrepresented stories, transform stereotypes, convene communities, and create dialogue.

Below, listen in as…


On this historical culinary journey, Lauren Tate Baeza introduces three staple grains from ancient Africa, how they were prepared, and how you can cook them today.

By Lauren Tate Baeza, Fred and Rita Richman Curator of African Art, High Museum of Art

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Image for post
Photo: The Washington Post/Getty

The Neolithic period was a time of global agricultural revolution marking the beginning of human settlements and more rapid population growth. Wild grasses were among the first widely domesticated plant species, and they were bred to produce crops such as wheat, corn, sorghum, and varietal millets. …


Find out how Tonalist artists of the 1800s used subtle modulations in color to create mood and atmosphere, and then create your own monochrome collage.

By Melissa Katzin, Manager of Family Programs, High Museum of Art

Do you have a favorite color? Do certain colors make you happy or sad, excited or calm? Artists throughout history have used specific colors to convey a feeling, mood, or idea. Some of the most well-known artists who used color this way were part of the Tonalism movement, which started in 1880.

Tonalist artists began painting landscapes using a limited color palette. …


This Black History Month, watch as we explore David Driskell’s self portrait that references the ancient Kingdom of Benin.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

Video credit: Ashley Wills

About David Driskell

Art Historian, curator, and artist, David Driskell was born in Eatonton, Georgia, in 1931. A lifelong educator, Driskell honed his teaching repertoire at HBCUs between 1955 through 1977, teaching at Talladega College, Howard University, and Fisk University.

David Driskell working on a self portrait in the 1950s.
David Driskell working on a self portrait in the 1950s.
David Driskell working on a self-portrait in his studio, Washington, DC, 1953. Courtesy of the David C. Driskell Papers at the David C. Driskell Center at the University of Maryland, College Park, via NGA.gov

The High Museum of Art’s relationship with Driskell began in 1977 when the Museum presented Driskell’s landmark exhibition, Two Centuries of Black American Art, the first traveling museum exhibition dedicated…


Between exhibitions, a calligraphy pop-up shop, and tons of great photo ops, there’s plenty to do with your loved one.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

A woman’s hand holds a greeting card with the message “Beautiful warrior, let love be your greatest weapon.”
A woman’s hand holds a greeting card with the message “Beautiful warrior, let love be your greatest weapon.”


In his upcoming talk, Cyrus will delve into the role of self-education in his artistic practice, as well as themes of Black American culture and spirituality in the African diaspora.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

Jamal Cyrus headshot in a white shirt and jean jacket.
Jamal Cyrus headshot in a white shirt and jean jacket.
Jamal Cyrus by Ronald Jones

In 2020, Houston-based artist Jamal Cyrus was awarded the High Museum of Art’s Driskell Prize in celebration of his significant contributions to the field of African American art.

On February 4, join Cyrus for his Driskell Prize Lecture: “Phylacteries to Repel Ghosts.”


Overcome with the bittersweet feeling of nostalgia, we may look to art as a bridge to a loving memory. Explore artworks, poetry, and music that conjure a distant home.

By Nancy Seda de León, Coordinator of Docents & Interns, High Museum of Art

Large horizontal painting in red, orange, and brown, with a neon light slashing through the center.
Large horizontal painting in red, orange, and brown, with a neon light slashing through the center.
Mary Weatherford (American, born 1963), Gloria, 2018

Welcome to Tide Pool — a series of multimedia blog posts meant to immerse you in a headspace of creativity and inspiration. Each post presents a collection of someone’s thoughts, like the glittering bits of life that emerge and remain in a tide pool. …


Get familiar with Art Nouveau style, learn about colorful Tiffany glassware, and try your hand at designing a vase.

By Melissa Katzin, Manager of Family Programs, High Museum of Art

Art Nouveau was a style of art, architecture, and decorative objects from 1890 to 1910. From Paris to Russia to America, the Art Nouveau, or “New Art,” style was a reaction against a formal, strict style of the nineteenth century, which was often about historical events and created to imitate earlier styles. …


With the High’s curator of American art as your guide, learn about this portrait of a seamstress from the 1930s.

Francis Criss (American, 1901–1973) was critically acclaimed for his distinctive blend of Realism and abstraction. Alma Sewing is his most ambitious and striking work.

Painting of a black woman with emphasized, powerful hands working at her sewing desk.
Painting of a black woman with emphasized, powerful hands working at her sewing desk.
Francis Criss (American, 1901–1973), Alma Sewing, ca. 1935

In its celebration of the artist as a worker, the painting is a quintessential 1930s expression, but it also makes a personal statement: a self-portrait appears in the lower half of the seamstress’s lamp. …


Learn about architect Louis Sullivan’s stylized designs, and then find unexpected objects to use as stamps on handmade cards or artworks.

By Melissa Katzin, Manager of Family Programs, High Museum of Art

Louis H. Sullivan (American, 1856–1924) was an architect and designer, and he spent most of his career in Chicago. Sullivan is known as the “father of skyscrapers” for his use of new developments in engineering to create high-rise buildings like the ones we see in cities today.

The Chicago Stock Exchange Building was one of the first modern skyscrapers, completed in 1894 and reaching thirteen stories high. Sullivan…

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