Show all the mamas some love with artful gifts, creative family activities, and an exhibition featuring women photographers.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

1. Try Your Hand at Drawing from Experience

May 8, 1–2:30 p.m., Members: $25, Not-Yet-Members: $40, Preregistration Required| Get Tickets

A ballerina serves as a figure model for a live drawing class on the High’s outdoor terrace.
A ballerina serves as a figure model for a live drawing class on the High’s outdoor terrace.

Join us on the beautiful Orkin Terrace for a drawing session led by local artist Larkin Ford! Each session focuses on a different way of seeing and capturing the world around us while allowing participants to explore their own personal expression and develop their drawing skills.

2. Get Creative at Family Art Escapes

May 8, 10:30 a.m.–3 p.m., Members: Free, Not-Yet-Members: $14.50, Preregistration Required | Get Tickets


What is it that drives us to create? Explore artworks, songs, and books to fuel your creative drive.

By Alex Delotch Davis, Manager of Marketing, High Museum of Art

Sculptural artwork featuring faceted geometric glass arranged in a semicircular pattern.
Sculptural artwork featuring faceted geometric glass arranged in a semicircular pattern.
Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian (Iranian, 1924–2019), Untitled (Muqarnas), 2012

Welcome to Tide Pool — a series of multimedia blog posts meant to immerse you in a headspace of creativity and inspiration. Each post presents a collection of someone’s thoughts, like the glittering bits of life that emerge and remain in a tide pool. This time, we’re invited into the headspace of Alex Delotch Davis, Manager of Marketing at the High.

In this mood board of sorts, enjoy a collage of…


Blacked out room hosting several large projector screens showing musicians playing alone in separate rooms.
Blacked out room hosting several large projector screens showing musicians playing alone in separate rooms.
Ragnar Kjartansson, The Visitors, 2012, nine-channel video with sound, duration: 64 minutes. Commissioned by the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich Installation view: Vinyl Factory, London, England; Photos by: © Jana Chiellino © Ragnar Kjartansson; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York and i8 Gallery, Reykjavik.

As we look for the light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, this world-renowned installation immerses viewers in an emotional experience that speaks to love, loss, connection, and isolation.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

As I headed toward the darkened gallery hosting Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors, I was met with a surge of sound, a moment of crescendo in the sixty-four-minute piece. A group of visitors came spilling around the corner, some arm in arm, one young woman in tears, fanning her eyes peeking out above her mask. …


Learn how artists use symbols to communicate without words, and try creating your own symbolic artwork.

By Melissa Katzin, Manager of Family Programs, High Museum of Art

Symbols have been used throughout art history to illustrate the invisible. From ancient art to modern art, we can find hidden meanings within artworks that tell us more about what, or who, we’re looking at.

In art, a symbol is an object or item that represents an idea or a feeling. Colors can be symbols, like yellow to denote happiness (check out our post on how landscape artists use color symbolism). …


Learn about Thrash, an artist who was instrumental in creating a new printmaking process that lent rich, deep tones to his prints of rural life in Georgia.

Video Credit: Ashley Wills

In the video above, Stephanie Heydt, the High Museum’s Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art, introduces Dox Thrash (1893–1965) and his artwork Georgia Cotton Crop.

In this work depicting a rural farm scene, Thrash intentionally obscures fine detail. The subject is, in fact, a memory of his youth and his family’s sharecropper farm near Griffin, Georgia.

Etching of a farmhouse with a cotton field in Georgia.
Etching of a farmhouse with a cotton field in Georgia.


Learn how to use shadows to ground your artworks in real space and time.

By Melissa Katzin, Manager of Family Programs, High Museum of Art

Pointilist painting, in yellows, greens, and blues, depicting a boy in a straw hat that casts a distinct shadow on his left shoulder.
Pointilist painting, in yellows, greens, and blues, depicting a boy in a straw hat that casts a distinct shadow on his left shoulder.


Learn about Ilse Bing, a photographer whose work documented the “new woman” of the early twentieth century.

Video credit: Ashley Wills

Ilse Bing (American, born Germany, 1899–1998) received her first camera as a teenager and continued to explore the medium as a complement to her doctoral studies in art history. By 1929, she decided to pursue photography professionally and moved from Frankfurt to Paris, where she quickly established herself as a leading photojournalist.

A highly experimental printer, she was also among the earliest photographers to adopt the newly introduced 35 mm Leica camera, whose small size and fast shutter allowed…


In the videos below, two Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellows share an insightful discussion on Bey’s photography and the power of his work.

By Eva Berlin, Digital Content Specialist, High Museum of Art

Four part portrait of a black girl wearing a school uniform and a necklace that reads “Diana.”
Four part portrait of a black girl wearing a school uniform and a necklace that reads “Diana.”
Dawoud Bey (American, born 1953), Diana, 1998

Since the beginning of his career in the 1970s, Dawoud Bey (American, born 1953) has used his camera to create poignant meditations on visibility, race, place, and American history. From early street portraits made in Harlem to a recent series imagining an escape from slavery on the Underground Railroad, Bey explores photography’s potential to reveal underrepresented stories, transform stereotypes, convene communities, and create dialogue.

Below, listen in as…


On this historical culinary journey, Lauren Tate Baeza introduces three staple grains from ancient Africa, how they were prepared, and how you can cook them today.

By Lauren Tate Baeza, Fred and Rita Richman Curator of African Art, High Museum of Art

Photo: The Washington Post/Getty

The Neolithic period was a time of global agricultural revolution marking the beginning of human settlements and more rapid population growth. Wild grasses were among the first widely domesticated plant species, and they were bred to produce crops such as wheat, corn, sorghum, and varietal millets. …

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